Myths and Facts About Circumcision

If you’re expecting a baby boy, one of the first medical decisions you may have to make is whether or not to have your newborn circumcised. In a circumcision, the hood of the penis is surgically removed in a simple procedure that typically takes less than 10 minutes.

Circumcisions are sometimes done for religious or cultural reasons. But many parents opt for circumcision even when these factors are not in play. That’s because studies show circumcisions are associated with some significant health benefits, during both childhood and adulthood.

Nevada Pediatric Specialists offers comprehensive newborn care in Henderson and Las Vegas, Nevada. Our providers know it’s much easier for parents to make medical decisions when they’re well-informed. Here are the facts our team would like you to know about three myths surrounding circumcision.

Myth: Circumcision doesn’t offer any real health benefits 

Fact: Circumcision can reduce the risks of sexually transmitted disease and other health problems.

In its most recent statement on newborn circumcision, the American Academy of Pediatrics says, “numerous studies suggest newborn circumcision can reduce the risk of urinary tract infections (UTIs), penile cancer and some sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including heterosexually acquired HIV, syphilis, herpes and human papillomavirus (HPV).” 

Studies have found that the health benefits of infant male circumcision exceed the risks by over 100-to-1, with half of adult males experiencing a foreskin-related medical problem during their lifetimes. One of the immediate benefits of circumcision: avoiding UTIs that can damage the kidneys in newborns and infants.

Myth: Circumcision reduces sexual pleasure later in life

Fact: Studies show circumcision has no impact on sexual pleasure or function.

Multiple studies have found that circumcision does not negatively affect sexual pleasure, penile sensitivity, or sexual function during adult years. Some studies indicate men who were circumcised experienced greater sexual pleasure and satisfaction.

Myth: It’s better to wait until my child can decide

Fact: There are benefits to early circumcision.

Newborn circumcision can help your child avoid UTIs and other foreskin-related problems as they get older, including a painful condition called phimosis, which is the inability to pull back the foreskin.

In an older child, circumcision recovery can take longer, and the risk of complications is greater. Studies also show early circumcision significantly reduces the risk of zipper injuries, a major cause of penile trauma. 

We can answer your questions

If you’re about to welcome a new son into your family, make an appointment with our team to talk about circumcision so you feel informed and confident about your decision. We can provide you with all the information you need about the circumcision procedure and how to care for your baby afterward.

Call Nevada Pediatric Specialists today, or use our online form to set up your appointment.

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